Mercy Health Muskegon New Medical Center Groundbreaking: Sunshine & Shovels

On a beautiful, sunny September 20, 2016 morning, Mercy Health Muskegon celebrated a very special groundbreaking event to mark the beginning of the construction phase of the new, $271M medical center in Muskegon. Hundreds of community members, dignitaries, elected officials and colleagues gathered in support for this transformational milestone, which will become part of Mercy Health Muskegon’s new legacy.

Donors form the community enjoyed a lunch provided by the Mercy Health Muskegon Philanthropy office, and the Team Club hosted a tent for colleagues who have donated to the hospital campaign. Currently, over $6.3M has been raised toward the $10M goal.

Various groups were involved in the physical groundbreaking – shoveling dirt and celebrating the start of the construction project, including Mercy Health Muskegon and regional board members, event program speakers, the Fazakerley family, Osteopathic Foundation board members, Philanthropy Council Executive Committee members, the Regional Executive Leadership Team, Mercy Health Muskegon’s Senior Leadership Team, Legislative Members / Dignitaries, Project Committees, and the Volunteer Board.

Over the past three years, Mercy Health Muskegon has taken an extraordinary journey to imagine and design an exceptional hospital facility. The new medical center project will ensure that strong, regional health care, with ready access to a wide variety of medical specialists, is available. The groundbreaking represents an historic day and a significant investment in our community’s health care.

Thank you to all of the teams who were involved in the successful planning of this event, and especially to our Mercy Campus colleagues who put our community first by parking offsite and bussing in for their shifts on this historic day.

See gallery of some of the highlights below, and view the media links for the news coverage of this historic day for Muskegon:

We garnered much media attention– here’s just a sampling:

MiBiz Article – Groundbreaking Coverage

MLive Muskegon Chronicle Groundbreaking Story

WOOD Radio

WOOD TV8 Groundbreaking Coverage

WZZM13 – MH New Medical Center Groundbreaking

FOX17 – Groundbreaking Coverage

MercyHeathWM Instagram Feed for Groundbreaking Photography

Mercy Health WM Facebook

 

Mercy Health Muskegon New Medical Center Groundbreaking: Sunshine & Shovels

On a beautiful, sunny September 20, 2016 morning, Mercy Health Muskegon celebrated a very special groundbreaking event to mark the beginning of the construction phase of the new, $271M medical center in Muskegon. Hundreds of community members, dignitaries, elected officials and colleagues gathered in support for this transformational milestone, which will become part of Mercy Health Muskegon’s new legacy.

Donors form the community enjoyed a lunch provided by the Mercy Health Muskegon Philanthropy office, and the Team Club hosted a tent for colleagues who have donated to the hospital campaign. Currently, over $6.3M has been raised toward the $10M goal.

Various groups were involved in the physical groundbreaking – shoveling dirt and celebrating the start of the construction project, including Mercy Health Muskegon and regional board members, event program speakers, the Fazakerley family, Osteopathic Foundation board members, Philanthropy Council Executive Committee members, the Regional Executive Leadership Team, Mercy Health Muskegon’s Senior Leadership Team, Legislative Members / Dignitaries, Project Committees, and the Volunteer Board.

Over the past three years, Mercy Health Muskegon has taken an extraordinary journey to imagine and design an exceptional hospital facility. The new medical center project will ensure that strong, regional health care, with ready access to a wide variety of medical specialists, is available. The groundbreaking represents an historic day and a significant investment in our community’s health care.

Thank you to all of the teams who were involved in the successful planning of this event, and especially to our Mercy Campus colleagues who put our community first by parking offsite and bussing in for their shifts on this historic day.

See gallery of some of the highlights below, and view the media links for the news coverage of this historic day for Muskegon:

We garnered much media attention– here’s just a sampling:

MiBiz Article – Groundbreaking Coverage

MLive Muskegon Chronicle Groundbreaking Story

WOOD Radio

WOOD TV8 Groundbreaking Coverage

WZZM13 – MH New Medical Center Groundbreaking

FOX17 – Groundbreaking Coverage

MercyHeathWM Instagram Feed for Groundbreaking Photography

Mercy Health WM Facebook

 

Congratulations to September 2016 DAISY Award Recipient Matt Mogck!

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Matt Mogck, RN on the PMU, signs the DAISY Award banner as the September 2016 recipient.

This month’s DAISY award goes to Matt Mogck, a nurse in the PMU. He was nominated by an astounding number (four) of his colleagues: Susan Burchardt, BSN, RN, clinical supervisor in the PMU; Hannah Wight, BSN, RN, clinical nurse in the PMU; Kelly Wybenga, BSN, RN, clinical supervisor at 8 Main; and Carrie Mull, BSN, RN-BC, clinical services manager in the PMU. The skill and compassionate care exemplified by Mogck to our patients, their families, and our staff shows him to be an outstanding role model, as demonstrated by his nominations.

One of his nominations reads:

“In April, I was called as a Psych Resource Team to 8 Main to assist with an upset patient who is well known to the PMU nursing staff. I told Matt that I was leaving the unit to help 8 Main, and he offered to help since he knew the patient really well. When we arrived on 8 Main, the patient was upset, paranoid and very delusional in his thoughts.

“The patient instantly recognized Matt and began to talk to him. Matt started out by asking what has you so upset? This patient responded to Matt. The other nurses were not able to connect with this patient, which led to some miscommunication. This patient had not slept or rested in days. Matt sat in the patient’s room and empathized with him. Limits were set and a contract was developed to keep both the patient safe and the staff feeling safe. Matt was able to connect with the patient, getting him to take his medications as prescribed.  This intervention was successful and the patient was able to rest and relax in his room, which is important for this patient’s healing.

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Staff on the PMU celebrate with DAISY Award Recipient for September 2016, Matt Mogck

“I believe Matt is an empathetic, caring and compassionate nurse. He is sincere in his care for his patients – especially those living with mental illness. He is free from judgment and he seeks to understand. Matt had connected with this patient in a caring and therapeutic manner when no one else was able to be there for him. Matt does an awesome job.”

A Mother/Baby Unit Newborn Car Seat Safety Program at the Mercy Health Muskegon

A Big Issue for Little Patients

demonstation-with-couple-1At Mercy Health Muskegon, Safe Kids West Michigan is working to solve a big problem for little patients. According to a study recently published in The Journal of Pediatrics, nine out of ten newborns are unsafe when discharged from the hospital and are in situations of serious car safety seat misuse.

In response, Safe Kids West Michigan has established a new child passenger safety program on the Mother/Baby Unit at the Mercy Health Muskegon Birth Center. The goal is to ensure that parents have the knowledge and skills to keep their child safe in the car before they leave the hospital. It is giving parents greater confidence knowing that their child will travel safely — in a car seat that has been fitted correctly and installed properly.demonstration-with-dad

Each week, Child Passenger Safety Technician (CPST) Melissa Wilder visits the Mother/Baby Unit at the Hackley Campus. She meets with new parents in their hospital rooms and answers any questions they may have about their car seat. Thanks to funding from AAA Michigan, she has a special iPad loaded with parent quizzes, car seat installation videos and manuals. The iPad gives Melissa ready access to information online and the freedom to move from room to room with ease.

“There is much to learn and many things parents don’t realize they don’t know. This is especially true for aftermarket products (untested pillows, padding and toys) that parents add to their seat without understanding the potential dangers of becoming projectiles in the case of a crash,” said Melissa.

The program at Mercy Health is integrated into the clinical care in the Mother/Baby Unit, so much so that RNs Becky Seckler, Erin Losee, Kristi Cooper and Traci Wilks have taken the 32-hour child passenger safety training course. This hospital-based child passenger safety program is one of only a few in the state and it is now available 24/7.

With hundreds of car seats/vehicle combinations, the job can be overwhelming. “We are reaching parents before they take their newborns home from the hospital. We are certain this program will cause misuse rates to drop and parents will be more confident than ever that they are doing all they can to keep their child safe,” said Holly Alway, Injury Prevention Coordinator for Mercy Health Muskegon.

Mercy Health Donates More Than 350 Backpacks to Local Law Enforcement Agencies

Backpacks Will be Distributed Throughout West Michigan Through School-based Programs

Thanks to the generous donations of Mercy Health colleagues over the past several months, more than 350 backpacks have been donated to the school-based programs of Kent County Sheriff’s Department and Muskegon Police Department. On Friday, September 16, 2016, at Heartside Health Center, a community benefit ministry of Mercy Health, backpacks were loaded into police vehicles in an assembly line formation to be given to children throughout West Michigan.

Receiving more than 1,000 backpack donations for its “Back-to-School Bash” held in August 2016, staff at Heartside Health Center wanted the extra backpacks to be used this school year, noting: “We are confident that we can fundraise past our goal next year,” said Rochelle Sather, site leader for Heartside Health Center.

Upon discovering that Muskegon Police Department and Kent County Sheriff’s Department each have school-based programs designed for officers to engage, interact and build relationships with students, Heartside Health Center staff decided to donate the backpacks to these programs so they could be used immediately within the community that Mercy Health serves.

“The Muskegon Police Department firmly believes that the younger we build positive relationships with the students, the more productive citizens they will be as they grow older,” said Chad Wilson, School Resource Officer for Muskegon Police Department. “Being able to supply students with the basics for school is another way to bridge the gap between the police department and our community.”

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About the School-based Programs:
The Kent County Sheriff Department’s School Resource Officer Program
: A collaborative effort between the schools, community, students, and law enforcement, creating a safe school environment by having a certified Police Officer assigned to a specific school district, the goal of the School Resource Officer Program is to provide proactive law enforcement by working with educators, students and parents in an effort to reduce crime, drug abuse, and violence in and around the school buildings and the school district. School Resource Officers currently work in six different districts across Kent County.

GREAT Program: Muskegon Police Department School Resource Officer Chad Wilson leads the Gang Resistance Education And Training (GREAT) program for nearly 300 fifth graders. Students learn a wide range of skills from anger management to making good choices. At the end of the year, all participants perform a community service project in the city. Find more info at www.greatonline.org.

Welcome to Fr. Joachim Adione, New Chaplain at Mercy Health Saint Mary’s

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Fr. Joachim Adione

Originally from the diocese of Nnewi, Nigeria, Fr. Joachim Adione (pronounced jo-ah-kim ah-dee-oh-nay) comes to serve as chaplain at Mercy Health Saint Mary’s, beginning in September 2016. Before coming to Grand Rapids, Fr. Adione served most recently as parochial vicar of Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish and a part-time Priest Chaplain at St. Mary’s Medical Center, both located in Grand Junction, Colorado.

“My motto is to serve God and humanity,” says Fr. Adione. “I enjoy my pastoral ministry through preaching, offering of the sacraments, visiting the sick and needy and helping youth.”

Fr. Adione has served in various capacities as a priest, such as a pastor, parish administrator, pastoral associate and a missionary in Abakalike Diocese in Nigeria.

Born in Nigeria as one of ten children, Fr. Adione was raised in a Catholic family and became a priest in 1996.

Please extend a warm welcome to Fr. Adione!

New MRI Procedures Provide Life-changing Opportunities for Patients With Parkinson’s Disease

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Tim Absher, RTMR

Fact #1: Mercy Health Saint Mary’s has one of the busiest DBS (deep brain stimulation) programs for Parkinson’s patients in the United States — having implanted more than 400 devices since the program began.

DBS therapy uses a surgically implanted medical device, similar to a pacemaker, to deliver mild electrical pulses to precisely targeted areas of the brain. For patients who do not respond to medications, this surgical solution alleviates many motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, such as tremor, rigidity, slowed movement, and walking problems.

What’s even more exciting is that patients with DBS devices now have access to full-body MRIs under special conditions, thanks to the dedication of Mercy Health Saint Mary’s MRI team.

Fact #2: Mercy Health Saint Mary’s is the only medical facility in Western Michigan — and one of only three in the entire state — that has the expertise to perform full-body conditional MRIs on patients with a DBS device.

Before May 2016, patients with DBS devices could only get a head MRI, greatly limiting their ability to benefit from the MRI’s diagnostic standard of care that does not expose patients to ionizing radiation as CT and conventional X-rays do.

For example, if a Parkinson’s patient had chronic back or joint pain, using an MRI for diagnosis was not an option — the risk of electrical shock or burn was too great.

MRI scans allow physicians to detect and/or monitor a wide range of health conditions, such as stroke, dementia, movement disorders, brain tumors, seizures, diseases of the spine, cancer, musculoskeletal issues and cardiac issues.

 Fact #3: Tim Absher, RTMR, and his team have put in the time and effort to undergo specialized training, adopt new protocols and operate within stringent scan parameters to make full-body MRIs that use radio frequency energy safe for patients. These updated MRI guidelines have been approved by the FDA.

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Leslie Neuman, MD

“This improves the quality of life for DBS patient by utilizing a more sophisticated, less harmful, less invasive and less painful modality for diagnosis of neurologic and non-neurologic disorders. Hopefully, this also improves the length of life for our patients,” says Leslie Neuman, MD, neurologist at Mercy Health Hauenstein Neurosciences.

Such technical challenges have led many health providers to shy away from this new full body scan.

“It took extra work up front to make sure that we were doing safe scans, but thanks to support from Medtronics [the DBS manufacturer], we have been successful,” says Absher.

Success is an understatement. Because of Saint Mary’s willingness to perform these scans, patients are coming from places like Kalamazoo, Petoskey, Albion, Alma, Mt. Pleasant, Alpena, as well as Grand Rapids. Clinicians and medical centers from around the state are making referrals to Mercy Health Saint Mary’s program.

“I’m proud that we have been able to provide this service when other health systems either cannot or will not do this,” adds Absher. “Anything that we can do that is effective for the patient and cost effective for the organization is super cool. I’m happy to be a part of that.”

Evolving From Pain Management to Comfort: Tara Nichols Shifts the Paradigm

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Tara Nichols, MS, RN, CCRN, CCNS, ACNS-BC, AGCNS-BC

As an expert on pain management, Tara Nichols, MS, RN, CCRN, CCNS, ACNS-BC, AGCNS-BC, grapples with this question on a daily basis:

“How do we support patients to find comfort and function in painful episodes and keep them safe, so that they may live their lives to the fullest?”

To help Mercy Health answer this question, Nichols began her role at Mercy Health Saint Mary’s in October 2015 as the Clinical Nurse Specialist of Pain Management.  She is an expert in Relationship-Based Care (RBC), caring science and pain management.

Nichols has been a Registered Nurse for 26 years and an Advance Practice Nurse for six years. Her professional priorities are to inspire people beyond their circumstances, promote innovation, and improve the patient experience. She is triple-certified as a Clinical Nurse Specialist in Adult Health, Critical Care and Adult-Gerontology.

Since joining Mercy Health, Tara has written a research proposal to establish the validity and reliability of a tool to measure comfort, a tool that includes pain management while elevating the role of collaboration of the inter-professional team. This model also has implications for challenging pain populations, such as patients dealing with chronic pain and/or drug addiction.

Prior to working for Mercy Health Saint Mary’s, Nichols was employed at Henry Ford Wyandotte Hospital, where she worked with Dr. John Nelson to structure data to show how concepts of caring science — such as clarity of role/self/system, civility and caring for self — relate to each other and impact outcomes, including job satisfaction. She also helped to create a predictive model of patient falls that helped with the proactive management of falls.

Tara was also a pain nurse at the University of Michigan for six years, where she participated in the University of Michigan Joint Commission Quality and Standards for Pain Management Committee.

September is Pain Awareness Month, a time when organizations work to raise public awareness of issues in the area of pain and pain management. The first Pain Awareness Month was in 2001, when the American Chronic Pain Association (ACPA) led a coalition of groups to establish September as Pain Awareness Month.  It was created to facilitate understanding among healthcare professionals, individuals living with pain, and the families of those living with chronic pain. This month is dedicated to increasing the appreciation of, and support for those people who live with pain and those who help them lead better lives.

Under-treatment of pain is a significant public health issue with far-reaching impact.  The Institute of Medicine in 2012 reported that the economic burden of pain exceeds $500 billion per year in the United States, including health care utilization cost and lost workforce productivity.
The major aim of this month is to promote education, awareness and advocacy, with the goal to recognize and address the barriers to pain management.

For more information on activities at Mercy Health Saint Mary’s for Pain Awareness Month, contact Nichols at:

Office phone: 616.685.6627
Available by Doc Halo 
tara.nichols@mercyhealth.com

Stomp Out Sepsis! Sepsis Awareness Month

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A small representation of the sepsis team, whose focus is to “stomp out sepsis!” From left to right: Ana Scott, Amie Dlouhy, Felicia Slabbekoorn, Kristy Todd, Lisa Kinsey-Callaway and Vicki Swendroski.

How We Are Fighting the Battle Against the Disease that Kills More People than Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer and AIDS Combined

Sepsis is described as the body’s inflammatory response to an overwhelming infection, causing injury to tissue and organs. It may lead to shock, multiple organ failure, and even death, especially if not recognized early and treated properly. Sepsis is the primary cause of death from infection, despite advances in modern medicine, according to World Sepsis Day materials.

The incidence of sepsis is increasing, mainly due to the aging population of our country. The elderly, extremely young, mentally ill and immunocompromised are the most at risk for developing sepsis.

Symptoms for sepsis can often be tricky, and can consist of the following, according to the Sepsis Alliance:

  • Hypothermia
  • Heart rate >90 beats per minute (bpm)
  • Fast respiratory rate
  • Altered mental status (confusion/coma)
  • Edema (swelling)
  • High blood glucose without diabetes
  • Falling down
  • Confusion

The cost of treating sepsis is rising. An estimated $14.6 billion was spent on hospitalizations for sepsis in 2008 in the US, not including precious loss of life.

At Mercy Health Saint Mary’s, a key player in the battle against sepsis is Vicki Swendroski, RN, who fills the new role as RN clinician for sepsis Joining her in this fight is a team of more than 30 inter-departmental clinicians. Shown here is a small representation of this group, from left to right: Ana Scott, Amie Dlouhy, Felecia Slabbekoorn, Kristy Todd, Lisa Kinsey-Callaway and Vicki Swendroski.

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A T-shirt representing the theme, “Stomping Out Sepsis.”

“For sepsis treatment, we strive to have four components completed within an hour,” said Swendroski. “The goal is to get blood cultures from two areas of the body, test the patient’s lactate level and prescribe the patient antibiotics and fluids to fight the infection.” Swendroski noted that prevention of infection, which causes sepsis, plays a big role in preventing sepsis altogether.

Questions about sepsis? Please contact Swendroski with any sepsis-related questions or concerns:

phone: 616.685.6481 (weekdays, 7 a.m.–4 p.m.)

pager: 616.397.7276

email: vicki.swendroski@mercyhealth.com.

Or Doc Halo.

Mercy Health Hackley Professional Pharmacy Seeks URAC Specialty Accreditation


The Hackley Professional Pharmacy will be the first pharmacy within the Trinity Health organization, and the fourth in the state of Michigan to receive Utilization Review Accreditation Commission (URAC)Specialty Pharmacy accreditation, with Mercy Health Saint Mary’s soon to follow. URAC defines a Specialty Pharmacy as a full service pharmacy that specializes in filling prescriptions for patients who need certain high-cost biotech and injectable medications. These specialty medications help patients with complex conditions including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, certain types of cancer, solid organ transplant, and hemophilia. These drugs can be injected, infused or taken orally, and typically require special handling and other specialty expertise.tara spec pharm 3

Currently, Hackley Professional Pharmacy is able to fill specialty prescriptions that come from the Mercy Health McClees Clinic for HIV/AIDS, and the Mercy Health Hep C Clinic, but the URAC Specialty Pharmacy accreditation will allow our pharmacists to dispense many more drugs that are in demand. The accreditation will eliminate the need for our Mercy Health pharmacists to send our patients and colleagues to places like CVS and Walgreens to fill their prescriptions. As an added benefit, colleagues with specialty medication needs will be able to take advantage of the 20% discount for filling their prescription through a Mercy Health facility.

Tara Zdybel, PharmD (pictured, right) – Pharmacy Manager at Hackley Professional Pharmacy stated, “Currently, our BCN Network insurance plan is forcing patients go to CVS for specialty medications because they have the contract through them. When we get URAC accredited we’re going to try and go for that, so our patients and colleagues can come to us, instead of having to go outside the organization.”

Presently, some prescription plans allow unaccredited pharmacies to fill certain types of specialty prescriptions, and we are servicing approximately 200-250 patients in our current specialty program. However, more and more prescription plans are going to require accreditation to dispense specialty medications in the future.

The process to become URAC accredited is lengthy, and Mercy Heath News will be following Hackley Professional Pharmacy throughout their journey. First, Hackley Professional Pharmacy will pay a fee and gather all necessary documentation.  Next, they will send URAC all documents for the “desktop review.” Finally, 4-6 weeks later, URAC will setup an onsite review, which includes interviews with pharmacy colleagues, and a tour of the facility.

After onsite review, the pharmacy will receive a “yes/no” or partial accreditation. There’s a period of time where we’re able to rectify any mistakes, and retry for accreditation if necessary.

Tara Zdybel, PharmD, Pharmacy Manager at Hackley Professional Pharmacy, would like to thank all of her colleagues for their continued effort and support while seeking URAC accreditation – specifically, Lisa Smith, PharmD, and Tanisha Norman – Specialty Tech, CPHT for spearheading this project.