Regular Screenings, Knowing Your Numbers Can Help Catch Diabetes Early

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) as many as one in three American adults will have diabetes by 2050 – unless we take steps to prevent it. If diabetes isn’t managed properly, it can lead to heart attacks, strokes, amputations, blindness, kidney failure and nerve damage.

That’s why, during American Diabetes Month, Mercy Health would like to encourage you to care for yourself and your loved ones by reminding you of the importance of regular health screenings.

Prediabetes – One third of U.S. adults have it

Did you know that one in three American adults has prediabetes? However, only 11.6 percent are aware that they have the condition. But what is prediabetes and what affect can it have on one’s future health?

Prediabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. Prediabetes is also called impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or impaired fasting glucose (IFG). If left untreated, 15-30 percent of prediabetes will lead to type 2 diabetes within five years. Individuals with prediabetes are also at increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease.

Take the quiz at the end of this article to find out if you are at risk for prediabetes.

Obtaining an annual health screening is the best way to find out if your numbers are within a healthy range for your gender, height and age.

If you would like more information on prediabetes and diabetes, please go to www.diabetes.org.

Having a primary care physician (PCP) who can coordinate your care is vital to your good health. A PCP typically specializes in Family Medicine, Internal Medicine or General Practice. If you don’t have a PCP, finding one is easy! Just visit your insurance carrier’s website, look for the “find a doctor” area and follow the instructions.

Look to Mercy Health Physician Partners to find a provider here>>

Mercy Health is committed to providing resources that promote wellness though body, mind and spirit and is dedicated to helping you live a healthy life.

Take the Prediabetes Test – Know Your Score

Answer these seven simple questions. For each “Yes” answer, add the number of points listed. All “No” answers are 0 points.
Question Yes No
Are you a woman who has had a baby weighing more than 9 pounds at birth? 1 0
Do you have a sister or brother with diabetes? 1 0
Do you have a parent with diabetes? 1 0
Find your height on the weight chart at the end of this article. Do you weigh as much as or more than the weight listed for your height? 5 0
Are you younger than 65 years of age and get little or no exercise in a typical day? 5 0
Are you between 45 and 64 years of age? 5 0
Are you 65 years of age or older? 9 0
Add up your score

If your score is 3 to 8 points: This means your risk is probably low for having prediabetes now. Keep your risk low. If you’re overweight, lose weight. Be active most days, and don’t use tobacco. Eat low-fat meals with fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain foods. If you have high cholesterol or high blood pressure, talk to your health care provider about your risk for type 2 diabetes.

If your score is 9 or more points: This means your risk is high for having prediabetes now. Please make an appointment with your health care provider soon.

At-Risk Weight Chart
Height Weight, pounds Height Weight, pounds
4’10” 129 5’7″ 172
4’11” 133 5’8″ 177
5’0″ 138 5’9″ 182
5’1″ 143 5’10” 188
5’2″ 147 5’11” 193
5’3″ 152 6’0″ 199
5’4″ 157 6’1″ 204
5’5″ 162 6’2″ 210
5’6″ 167 6’3″ 216
6’4″ 221

Trinity Health is a Catholic health care facility that is firmly committed to maintaining fidelity to its Catholic identity by closely conforming to the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services (ERDs).

Diabetes.org and the links it provides are independent sites and have no obligation to provide information that is always congruent with the ERDs. Trinity Health cannot guarantee their content and ask your discretion when using information from this site.

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